Panning For Rental Property

MD new housing starts 2000-2011Gullgraver_1850_California

I know.  In today’s modern world, that’s a pretty goofy mental image: some old-timer crouching over a stream and sifting for that one gold nugget.  And yet, that’s kind of what we did when we looked for our first rental property.  I estimated that we spent ~200 hours screening properties to find The One.

Now that we’re officially on the hunt again, I figured I would detail the process we’ve used previously and are planning to use (and evolve) again.  Although, this time we’re looking for something a bit different.

So let’s start with the master plan:

  1. We have a 2br/2ba condo that is a pure investment property.
  2. We live in a 4br/2.5ba townhouse with a low enough cost structure and in a very desirable neighborhood that it should also make for a good rental.
  3. We want a single family house close to my wife’s employer, in a neighborhood with good public schools, and with a dedicated rental space.

So, the goal is to keep house #2, rent it out, and add a third rental to offset the cost of our next place.  As always, our general philosophy is buy and hold.  I guess that means we have some pretty specific requirements.  Perhaps some of these characteristics reflect others’:

  • “Class A” (lots of folks have different definitions; this is close enough for my purpose)
  • Good k-12 public schools (7+ on greatschools.org)
  • Close (<2 miles) to public transit (for us that means trains into DC)
  • Close (<1/2 miles) to a community park, ideally with running/biking trails
  • Because we’re looking to use part of our house as a rental (e.g. a big chunk of a finished basement), we need to be near our target tenants’ desired location, have a separate access, and have utilities available for the rental space
  • We’re looking to offer our tenants a studio or 1br space for between $750 and $1000 a month
  • Modest appreciation, at least keeping up with inflation.  We’re in the buy and hold space, so we’re not looking for anything that requires huge increases in value to make our investment pay off.

I’ve been doing some digging on this topic since I listened to a podcast by Paula Pant over at Afford Anything where she outlined some of the key factors she uses to invest in real estate:

  • Price to rent ratios
  • Building permits (new starts and renovations)
  • Job creation
  • Infrastructure development

Over the next few posts, I’d like to dig into some of these factors a bit as I’ll be exploring them in more depth as part of our own search.  I know there’s lots of discussion out there about “big” data.  My goal isn’t to make this into a science project, but I do believe there’s some useful data available for real estate investors, and it is not limited to subscription only sources.

Let’s start with an example.  We currently live in MD, and we’re looking for our next property in MD.  So, I started at Maryland’s open data site.  There’s a bunch of data sets to geek out with.

I’ll pick the new residential housing units data set to start.  In theory, a county with lots of growth, would be likely to offer a good opportunity.  Here’s a quick snapshot of the 24 MD counties, their total new residential housing starts from 2000 through 2011 (I couldn’t find a more recent data source).  I also included a line chart view of each county over that time period to illustrate any trends.

It looks like the top three counties from this time period were Montgomery, Prince George’s, and Anne Arundel.  On each of their trendlines, you can see upticks in the last 3-4 years.   Thinking back to that era, the 2005 BRAC was in full swing.  While it may have caused significant challenges around the country, the Ft. Meade area and it’s surrounding counties (those three) benefited from a significant influx of DOD related jobs.

What do you think?  Do new residential starts portend a good rental real estate market?  Will this trend continue in the future?  There’s always talk of the DC “bubble,” although with the current president working to limit federal government employees, the real estate sector may be in for another shake-up in this area.  Drop me a line and let me know.

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